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Michelle Connolly

Forest Stewards
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  1. Image: Conservation North's Seeing Red Map, which shows that almost all primary forest in BC is gone. Widely circulated new map depicting BC's disappearing primary forests raises thorny questions about the state of BC's forests. The creators clarify what it shows. Go to story...
  2. Widely circulated new map depicting BC's disappearing primary forests raises thorny questions about the state of BC's forests. The creators clarify what it shows. Part of the Seeing Red Map showing remaining primary forest (in green) and the part of BC that has been industrially logged (red). Click on the map to enlarge, or see a live scalar version which allows you to examine specific areas of the province in finer detail. AT CONSERVATION NORTH, we are pleased with the widespread viewing of our primary forests map called “Seeing Red” and with so many favourable comments
  3. Conservationists call for a moratorium on primary forest logging in the Prince George TSA following a scathing report by the Forest Practices Board. A large clearcut in the Prince George Timber Supply area. Photo by Sean O’Rourke/Conservation North CONSERVATION NORTH is calling for a moratorium on industrial logging in the Prince George Timber Supply Area following the release of an investigative report by the Forest Practices Board (“the Board”). The Board concluded that biodiversity is at high risk in the vast majority of landscape units within the Prince George and
  4. May 20, 2020 Photo: Michelle Connolly surveys logging in the Inland Rainforest BC's minister of forests refers to forests as "feedstock." Why does he use an agricultural term to describe a forest? Go to story

    © Mary Booth, Conservation North

  5. BC's minister of forests refers to forests as "feedstock." Why does he use an agricultural term to describe a forest? A new logging road under construction in the Inland Rainforest (Photo by Taylor Roades) IN Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell describes a dystopian society in which language is used to control people. In Orwell’s fictional world, vocabulary is constrained and new words are created in order to simplify and manipulate people’s understanding of the world around them. Orwell suggested that the well-known connection between language and worldview could
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