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openspaceartsociety

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  1. until
    Open Space is proud to present Queer City Cinema's QALEIDOSCOPE: Queer Film on Tour on January 18 and 19 at 8:00 pm. QALEIDOSCOPE: Refraction, Abstraction, and Play in Queer Media Art — will be a well-textured assemblage of images, characters, ideas, and realities that collide in fantastical, personal, and playful ways to produce an ever-changing, multi-faceted queer media art viewing experience. The festival features 22 different media and film artists such as Vivek Shraya, Blair Fukumura, Kent Monkman, and Diana Khong. Festival Dates: Friday, January 18, 2019, 8:00 pm and Saturday, January 19, 2019, 8:00 pm Admission is by donation with a suggested donation of $5-10.
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    On January 17, Open Space presents Jesse Campbell’s Blanketing, the second annual installation in the stairwell to the gallery. The public is invited to an opening reception for the work on Thursday, January 17 at 7pm. The event will begin with a dialogue around working as Indigenous artists on territory other than your own, facilitated alongside Aboriginal Curator Eli Hirtle. Reception: January 17, at 7:00PM
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    From January 13 to February 26, Open Space presents Chantal Gibson’s visual and text art exhibition How She Read: Confronting the Romance of Empire. Through altered book sculptures that ensnare the texts with braids and thread, redacted texts, and reprints of old children’s readers, Gibson’s work asks us to consider the voices, stories, and bodies that have been erased or excluded from historical narratives and proposes material ways in which we can resist those historical erasures. Opening: Sunday, January 13 from 3-5pm
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    Saturday, November 17 at 7:30pm, join us for Open Word: Readings and Ideas with Larissa Lai to celebrate the release of her new dystopian novel, The Tiger Flu.The Tiger Flu is a feminist, cyberpunk thriller that explores disease and technology, and imagines how women—queer women of colour, in particular—might go on to build community in a world that threatens them with extinction.Larissa Lai has authored two novels, When Fox Is a Thousand and Salt Fish Girl; two poetry collections, sybil unrest (with Rita Wong) and Automaton Biographies; and a critical book, Slanting I, Imagining We: Asian Canadian Literary Production in the 1980s and 1990s. She was assistant professor in Canadian Literature at UBC from 2007–2014. In 2014, she returned to the University of Calgary to take up a Canada Research Chair in Creative Writing.Larissa will read from The Tiger Flu at 7:30, then join in conversation with scholar and writer Claire Huot. Claire Huot is the author of two academic books on contemporary Chinese culture, and of two novels, both with the same bilingual (Chinese-English) female detective. With Robert Majzels she created the experimental translation of Chinese poetry that was published as “85”.The event is free / by donation. Doors open at 7:00. There will be books for sale by cash/credit, and a cash bar—come prepared!-- Open Space respectfully acknowledges that we are on unceded First Nations territory. The City of Victoria and the surrounding areas lie on the territories of the Coast Salish and Lekwungen-speaking peoples, including the Esquimalt, Songhees, and W̱SÁNEĆ First Nations. Open Space is not wheelchair accessible and is accessed by a flight of 23 stairs. There are two gender inclusive washrooms, one multi-stall and one single stall with a urinal. If you have any other questions or concerns in regards to accessibility, please contact office@openspace.ca or 250-383-8833.
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    Friday, November 9, 2018, 7:00 pmto Saturday, December 15, 2018, 5:00 pm Disparate objects find new meaning in at random, the upcoming exhibition at Open Space artist-run centre by Ontario based artist Hyang Cho. The exhibition, opening on Nov. 9, is made up of collections of modest, mundane objects ranging from hand-copied letters to a collection of stones, jars, and old books discarded by public libraries. Through her work, Cho examines these everyday objects and reworks them in ways that make them both familiar and strange, alike and different, systematic and arbitrary. The library books are glued shut, inaccessible to even the eager reader. The jars are cleaned of any identifying labels and evacuated of contents. The stones are cast in wax, making them oddly alike despite their varying origins. And the letters, sourced from the internet, are written across multiple languages unfamiliar to the artist, so their contents remain hidden to her, but for the shape of the text she has painstakingly copied out by hand. Canadian Art noted in a 2015 review of Cho’s work, “There’s no deceit or superfluity, so there’s nothing much, and it all turns out to be something of great substance.” Born and raised in Seoul, Korea, and currently based in Guelph, Ontario, Hyang Cho has exhibited extensively across Ontario and Western Canada. Cho holds a BA in History from Sogang University, a BFA from the Alberta College of Art and Design and an MFA from the University of Guelph. Her art practice engages in repetitive processes that challenge ideas of completeness, efficiency, correctness and rationality by testing them against process, repetition, omission, translation, and error. Cho’s works observe the sense of anxiety, uncertainty, and tension embedded in daily life and perceive the passing of time in the everyday; not time as it appears in memorable moments or as a unit of measurement, but time as it passes, accumulates, and sometimes repeats. Cho is represented by Georgia Scherman Projects. Opening reception: Friday, Nov. 9 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Artist talk: Saturday, Nov.10 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. At random will run at Open Space Nov. 9 - Dec. 16, with gallery hours from Tuesday to Saturday, 12-5pm. The artist would like to acknowledge support from the Canada Council for the Arts and Ontario Arts Council.
  6. Open Space and The Fifty Fifty Arts Collective present Gordon Grdina's The Marrow Thursday, October 25 at 7:30pm. Gordon Grdina is a Vancouver-based JUNO Award winning oud/guitarist whose career has spanned continents, decades and constant genre exploration throughout avant-garde jazz, free form improvisation, contemporary indie rock and classical Arabic. His singular approach to the instruments have earned him recognition from the highest ranks of the jazz/improv world. The Marrow combines Middle Eastern music with avant-garde jazz. It includes renowned bassist and composer Mark Helias (bass), seasoned improvisational cellist Hank Roberts (cello) and Vancouver-based percussionist Hamin Honari (tombak, daf, frame drum). The music, all original compositions by Grdina mostly based on classical Arabic and Persian modes, provides a context for creative group interplay and solos that often involve extended tonality. The music is intricate, sometimes delicate, other times high-risk exciting. Together, The Marrow promises to enthral and delight. Admission is free / by donation. Doors open at 7:00.
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    Friday, September 7 from 7-10pm join us for the opening reception of David Khang's La Monte Young Projects. In 1960, minimalist composer La Monte Young produced the conceptual Compositions 1960, challenging ideas of what constitutes performance and music. 50 years on, how do they resonate? In La Monte Young Projects, Vancouver-based artist David Khang re-interprets the compositions to facilitate the performance of a non-verbal language and interrogate social constructions of gender, race, and interspecies relations. The reception will feature a performance by David Khang and members of the Victoria Composer's Collective at 8pm.
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    BYOB—Bring your own beads to start a project, finish a project, or just sit in circle and share stories!Bead by Bead is a 4-session circle hosted at Open Space by Aboriginal Curator Lindsay Delaronde. We will come together to share techniques, ideas, and good laughs. Beading is our way to tell stories, to come back into grounding and focus. As an activity, it is therapeutic and healing and has strong ties to our cultural ways of knowing and understanding who we are as Indigenous peoples.All welcome! Come to one or all of the sessions. Some materials and snacks will be provided.--Open Space respectfully acknowledges that we are on unceded First Nations territory. The City of Victoria and the surrounding areas lie on the territories of the Coast Salish and Lekwungen-speaking peoples, including the Esquimalt, Songhees, and W̱SÁNEĆ First Nations. Open Space is not wheelchair accessible and is accessed by a flight of 23 stairs. There are two gender inclusive washrooms, one multi-stall and one single stall with a urinal. If you have any other questions or concerns in regards to accessibility, please contact office@openspace.ca or 250-383-8833.
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    Not your typical tour of Victoria! Join artist David LaRiviere for an anti-tourism walking tour of the city, stopping at sites featured in stories told by participants of his media arts project #everysordiddetail. The tour will begin at Open Space with an artist talk about the project from 2-2:30pm.An “anti-tourist” project opposing the touristic narratives of the city in favour of fragmentary or messy bits of real life, #everysordiddetail seeks to create an alternative and uncensored map of the city. While in residency from June 1st to July 31st, LaRiviere has been connecting with people living in Victoria and recording their stories of the diverse material of daily life in the city. Volunteer participants have responded to the simple question “What happened?”From these stories, LaRiviere has created an interactive map and audio tour, geo-locating interviews to the site where they occurred, and allowing those who take the audio tour to experience everyday surfaces imbued with a new sense. From August 2-25 the public is invited to engage in the anti-tourism tour and listen to the recorded interviews through the #everysordiddetail app. Open Space will also host an opening reception on Thursday, August 2 from 7 to 9pm to celebrate the gallery exhibition and launch of the app.--Open Space respectfully acknowledges that we are on unceded First Nations territory. The City of Victoria and the surrounding areas lie on the territories of the Coast Salish and Lekwungen-speaking peoples, including the Esquimalt, Songhees, and W̱SÁNEĆ First Nations. Open Space is not wheelchair accessible and is accessed by a flight of 23 stairs. There are two gender inclusive washrooms, one multi-stall and one single stall with a urinal. If you have any other questions or concerns, please contact openspace@openspace.ca or 250-383-8833.
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    You're invited! Artist and Aboriginal Curator Lindsay Delaronde is hosting another Iroquois Social at Open Space Tuesday, July 24 from 6-8pm. If you missed the last one (held in May), this is your chance to gather for a lively celebration of community, food, song, and dance. The evening will begin with a talk by Kanen'to:kon Hemlock, a Mohawk community Bear Clan Chief from Kahnawake. Kanen'to:kon Hemlock is a teacher of language, culture, and history at the Kahnawake Survival School and current grad student at the University of Victoria.The talk will be followed by a community potluck—folks are encouraged to bring a dish to share from their cultural background. After a hearty feast, Lindsay will lead us in songs and dances.Kids, elders, and everyone in-between welcome!--Open Space respectfully acknowledges that we are on unceded First Nations territory. The City of Victoria and the surrounding areas lie on the territories of the Coast Salish and Lekwungen-speaking peoples, including the Esquimalt, Songhees, and W̱SÁNEĆ First Nations. Open Space is not wheelchair accessible and is accessed by a flight of 15 stairs. There are two gender inclusive washrooms, one multi-stall and one single stall with a urinal. If you have any other questions or concerns about accessibility, please contact openspace@openspace.ca or 250-383-8833.
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    Open Space's New Music program presents Chris Corsano, Elisa Ferrari, and John Brennan's collaboration, corsano / brennan / dashes(--) on Friday, June 22 at 7:30pm. Doors open at 7:00.– – / dashes is a sound collaboration between John Brennan and Elisa Ferrari.– – pays homage to the incidental and ephemeral microtonal exchanges that occur through layering sustained dissonant frequencies, live samples, subtle movements and vocalization of text borrowed from dictionaries, language, and sound manuals.In their improvised performances, – – combines sounds of amplified objects, feedback manipulation and modified percussion with field recordings and voice. Central to their approach to improvisation is an emphasis on the sonic interstices and slippages between the listeners/performers’ inner thoughts and the perception of the acoustic environment outside.Artist bios:Chris Corsano is a drummer who has been working at the intersections of collective improvisation, free jazz, avant-rock, and noise music since the late 1990's. His work incorporates spontaneously composed amalgams of extended techniques for drum set and non-percussion instruments of his own making that are incorporated into his kit. Examples of these invented instruments include violin strings stretched across drum heads, and modified reed instruments that transform the drums into resonators which can, in turn, be used to incite strips of metal to react to the drum membranes' Chladni-plate-like modes of vibration. Corsano's dedication to collective improvisation has resulted in his appearance on over 140 records and 1000 live performances. Born in Italy, Elisa Ferrari is an artist and curator living in Vancouver, unceded Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh territories. She works with text, image, and sound. To consider acts and implications of retrieval, she produces projects that manifest as installations, sound walks, artist books, and performance; often addressing or incorporating archival fragments. Ferrari holds a BFA from the University of Architecture of Venice (IUAV) and a MAA from the Emily Carr University of Art and Design (ECUAD). From 2013 to 2017 she worked as Events and Exhibitions Coordinator/Curator at VIVO Media Arts Centre. She is part of – – / dashes, a sound performance collaboration with John Brennan. She is currently collaborating with Stacey Ho on a book of graphic scores for deep listening and sound making.John Brennan is a sound artist, drummer, and new music curator living in Vancouver, unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations. Between 2012 and 2016 he founded and curated Destroy Vancouver (DV) an improvised music and sound art series produced by VIVO Media Arts Centre that brought together international improvisers with local and national sound artists and musicians. His recent performance and improvisation has expanded to include sound installations and sound sculptures that consider the relationship between the sonic memory of musical instruments, performance, and improvisation. Admission is free / by donation.
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    Toronto-based artist Jennie Suddick's exhibition The Tree House Project envisions the tree house as both a personal space and a realm of the imagination, a lens through which to consider changing landscape, autonomy, and nostalgia. During June of 2017, Suddick invited the Victoria community to share unrealized childhood plans for tree houses and other forts in a workshop held at Open Space. From the collaborative sketches assembled, she has created scale paper architectural models and detailed drawings that bring new life to these thwarted childhood ambitions. Visit with the artist while she is in residency at Open Space from Jun 13-22 from 3-5pm. Please join us Saturday June 16 at 2:00pm for an artist talk and workshop with Jennie Suddick. The opening reception will be held at 7:00pm on Thursday June 21. The exhibition will run June 13-July 28, 12-5pm Tuesday-Saturday at Open Space.
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    May 8 and 9, the SALT New Music Festival and Symposium welcomes Germany’s acclaimed Schola Heidelberg and Ensemble Aisthesis for four programs of new work by Canadian and international artists. The KlangForum Heidelberg is where two very distinctive formations pool their interpretive élan and their astounding virtuosity: the voices of the Schola Heidelberg and the instrumentalists of the Ensemble Aisthesis. The two ensembles for contemporary and ancient music thrill their audiences all over Germany, at international festivals and as much-sought-after guests of major concert series. With its innovative concert formats, KlangForum Heidelberg has injected new life into the relationship between music and society. Conductor for the ensemble is Walter Nussbaum. The festival comprises two workshops at Open Space (510 Fort Street, 2nd floor) and two evening concerts at Congregation Emanu-El Synagogue (1461 Blanshard Street). Program of events Tuesday 8 May 11:00am-1:00pm — Young composer's reading session at Open Space 2:00pm-4:00pm — Young composer’s reading session at Open Space 8:15pm — Open rehearsal at Congregation Emanu-El. Featuring the music of Örjan Sandred, Philippe Leroux, and Claude Vivier. Wednesday 9 May 7:30pm — Concert and lecture at Congregration Emanu-El. The final concert, featuring works of Dániel Péter Biró and Gideon Klein, will be presented by the Klangforum Heidelberg and Ensemble Aisthesis. This last year, Dániel Péter Biró has been composing a large-scale musical composition based on Baruch Spinoza’s philosophical work, Ethica. They will also perform a work written by Gideon Klein during his internment in the Theresienstadt Concentration Camp. These events are presented in collaboration with the SALT New Music Festival and Symposium and Open Space. The festival is made possible through support from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Canada Council for the Arts, the BC Arts Council and the Goethe Institute. -- FMI: Dave Shively, New Music Coordinator newmusic@openspace.ca http://tsilumos.org/salt2018/
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    On Friday 4 May at 7:30 pm, electric indigenous American poet Tommy Pico will read at Open Space from his latest book, Junk. The third in a series kicked off by IRL and Nature Poem, Junk delves into the detritus of colonialism, pop culture, junk food, queer desire, and loss, examining the things we can’t let go—or that refuse to let go of us. “This is poetry of the highest order, on the level of a pop song, with the crystalline visions of a seer.” —Jenny Zhang Tommy “Teebs” Pico is an indigenous American poet and karaoke enthusiast. Originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation, he is now based in Brooklyn. Pico was a Queer/Art/Mentors inaugural fellow, a 2013 Lambda Literary fellow in poetry, 2016 Tin House summer poetry scholar, 2017 NYSCA/NYFA Fellow in Poetry from the New Foundation for the Arts, and won the Brooklyn Public Library’s 2017 Literature Prize. He is the 2018 winner of the Whiting Award for poetry. Tommy Pico also co-curates the reading series Poets With Attitude (PWA) with Morgan Parker, is co-host of the podcast Food 4 Thot, and a contributing editor at Literary Hub. -- FMI: Kara Stanton literary@openspace.ca http://openspace.ca/programming/open-word-readings-and-ideas-tommy-pico -- Open Space respectfully acknowledges that we are on unceded First Nations territory. The City of Victoria and the surrounding areas lie on the territories of the Coast Salish and Lekwungen-speaking peoples, including the Esquimalt, Songhees, and W̱SÁNEĆ First Nations. Open Space is not wheelchair accessible and is accessed by a flight of 15 stairs. There are two gender inclusive washrooms, one multi-stall and one single stall with a urinal. Please get in touch if you have any other questions or concerns.
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    In partnership with Canadian Art and to celebrate the launch of its spring issue “Dirty Words,” Open Space will host Divya Mehra and Amy Fung to present Difficult People on Thursday 22 March at 7:30 p.m. As a public experiment and ongoing private conversation, Difficult People consists of artist Divya Mehra (Scorpio) and writer Amy Fung (Scorpio) tracing their respective, and at times, overlapping experiences of living and working in the Canadian Prairies. Mehra’s performative lecture explores memory, race, death, and the service industry in a series of non-linear short stories and poetics. The performance, as well as her overall practice, asks “how do we exist within the crushing indifference of our day to day?” Sharing similar intentions of re-examining the mundane violence of white supremacy, Fung will be reading an excerpt from a new work in progress, Before I was a critic, I was a human being.
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