Jump to content

Pamela Roth

Writers
  • Content Count

    4
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  1. November 2017 The organization appears to offer addicts a needed route to recovery, while preserving farmland. What’s the hold up? RYAN COLWELL WAS ONCE ON THE FAST TRACK TO DEATH. Addicted to heroin and fentanyl, the former Surrey resident found himself living on the streets of Victoria at the age of 24, bouncing from shelter to shelter for a place to lay his head. Every day was the same routine—search for more drugs and money, which he’d steal and rob from people in order to get his next fix. “It’s pretty sad,” said the soft-spoken Colwell, sitting on a pile of hay bale
  2. And what will happen next summer when recreational cannabis becomes legal in Canada? FOR THREE YEARS, Chris Zmuda soaked in the sweet smell of success wafting from his Downtown deli, the Taste of Europe, on Douglas Street. With the help of three employees, Zmuda happily served lunches made from the Polish recipes he acquired from his home country, and built a loyal group of customers eager to feast on kapuska soup and homemade pierogies. But in March of last year, his deli turned into a cannabis sandwich thanks to the arrival of two marijuana dispensaries on either side of his
  3. Unintended consequences of Airbnbs are leading to new measures to deal with the loss of housing stock. FOR $138 PER NIGHT, one can stay in a luxury two-bedroom condo in the heart of downtown Victoria. Located on Humboldt Street, the condo is within walking distance to a number of amenities and popular attractions. It’s also fully equipped with a concierge. But the condo is not a hotel; it’s a residential building where many residents no longer know their neighbour. Instead, they see a string of new faces passing through the halls each week, people arriving late at night, makin
  4. The organization appears to offer addicts a needed route to recovery, while preserving farmland. What’s the hold up? RYAN COLWELL WAS ONCE ON THE FAST TRACK TO DEATH. Addicted to heroin and fentanyl, the former Surrey resident found himself living on the streets of Victoria at the age of 24, bouncing from shelter to shelter for a place to lay his head. Every day was the same routine—search for more drugs and money, which he’d steal and rob from people in order to get his next fix. “It’s pretty sad,” said the soft-spoken Colwell, sitting on a pile of hay bales at Central Saanic
×
×
  • Create New...