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Trudy Duivenvoorden Mitic

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  1. Image: Some of the trees in Doumac Park A visit to Doumac Park in Saanich comforts—yet reminds of the über commodification of nature and BC’s farcical forest management strategy. Go to story
  2. A visit to Doumac Park in Saanich comforts—yet reminds of the über commodification of nature and BC’s farcical forest management strategy. WHENEVER I'VE FELT ANXIOUS AND DISCOURAGED by all the exceptional challenges of this past year, I’ve found myself walking to the trees. It feels odd to say that they speak to me, but when I start down the long set of stairs into the Cordova Bay ravine known as Doumac Park, the sounds of civilization fall quiet behind me and I can feel Nature beckoning. A small rainforest thrives in this basin, in the filtered sunlight and almost prehistori
  3. Photo: Monarch Butterfly A look to the recent past shows how humans have hurt the Earth and its creatures. We need to do better. Go to story
  4. A look to the recent past shows how humans have hurt the Earth and its creatures. We need to do better. THIS PAST CHRISTMAS I gave my guy a device that converts slides to digital images, the perfect project for these COVID at-home hours, days, weeks and months. Secretly I plotted that we—mostly he—might finally comb through boxes of old slides and negatives, teasing the prized keepsakes away from the celluloid chaff. As a result, we’ve been rediscovering hundreds of images and innumerable memories from the early days together, four decades ago. The most startling thing we not
  5. Posted January 15, 2021 Give this new year a fighting chance at being a happy one by nurturing social connection. Go to story
  6. Give this new year a fighting chance at being a happy one by nurturing social connection. AND SO HERE WE ARE, having laboured our way over the threshold into a fresh new year and decade, our backs solidly turned on 2020 as if that year in itself incited the pestilence. But only one week in, 2021 already feels like an aging clunker dragging along on under-inflated tires. The short, cheerless days of early January don’t help at the best of times, nor does the inevitable post-holiday letdown, especially when the holidays themselves have been a letdown. Add on the omnipresen
  7. The ultimate festival of mingling and consuming is being revamped this year into a celebration we’ll likely never forget. IN THE DAYS LEADING UP TO CHRISTMAS, I enjoy getting cozy on the couch with stories and reminiscences of Christmases gone by. I know it’s a bit of sentimental self-indulgence, but my “research” clearly reveals that the celebrations people remember with the greatest affection are almost never about extravagance, and almost always about the trials and triumph of getting home for the holidays and being together with loved ones. “Home” is perhaps the most endu
  8. Posted November 25, 2010 A close-to-heart climate hero instills hope, courage, and solidarity. Go to story
  9. A close-to-heart climate hero instills hope, courage, and solidarity. EIGHT MONTHS INTO A PANDEMIC that as of yet shows no end, I’ve found a new hero and guiding light—my youngest brother Carl. I know he’ll fidget with discomfort when I tell him this, maybe suggest I ease up on hyperbole, possibly even wonder if I’ve gone off my rocker. But I’ll insist I know a hero when I see one—a selfless, genuinely good person who, even against formidable odds, chooses to devote life and livelihood to the betterment of a greater common cause. Heroes are resourceful and resilient, typicall
  10. Posted October 19, 2020 Image: A forest fire threatens a small BC Interior community. This time, vote as if your life depends on it. Go to story
  11. This time, vote as if your life depends on it. Another forest fire threatens another community in BC IN MY HOME IN SAANICH, recently socked in under a persistent dome of noxious smog, I had everything on my mind. It was not a comfortable feeling, stacked as it was on top of pandemic perturbation and a clatter of intertwined environmental, social and economic crises, all seemingly now coming to a head. They spun like bumper cars in my brain, colliding wildly in all directions, bashing, smashing and revving up anguish. One crashed into the memory of a line from
  12. Posted September 24, 2020. Image: A peony seed pod. We have no future without seeds and seed diversity. They are our food and medicine, a sacred and essential resource. Go to story
  13. We have no future without seeds and seed diversity. They are our food and medicine, a sacred and essential resource. WE ARE INTO THE FINEST SEASON OF ALL—the harvest time—and despite all the unprecedented tumult this year, the Earth is again offering up abundant bounty. I am both awed and grateful as I make my way around garden beds crammed with carrots, beets, Swiss chard, kale, tomatoes and a medley of summer and winter squashes. I say “crammed” because in amongst our planned crops are the volunteers sown by nature. While I can’t say enough good about the dependable, open-po
  14. Posted August 18, 2020 Photo: The author's Stargazer Lilies We’ve made a fine mess of this blue dot…but nature has incredible healing powers. Go to story
  15. We’ve made a fine mess of this blue dot…but nature has incredible healing powers. MY GARDEN’S ONGOING VARIETY SHOW currently has the effusive Stargazer lilies owning the stage, their clusters of bold and magnificent flowers vying with each other for audience attention. They look like the hybridized confections they are, the planned offspring of two lesser, Oriental-type lilies, using science that was unlocked by Gregor Mendel more than 150 years ago. That’s impressive tinkering for sure, but it would all amount to nothing if it weren’t for nature. We can plunk a pixel of seed
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