Jump to content

Anthony Britneff

Subscribers
  • Posts

    12
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Anthony Britneff's Achievements

  1. Thanks Hans for your story with which I agree wholeheartedly. However, for me, to certify forest management in British Columbia as sustainable is more than an abuse of the language but rather a false claim that misleads Canadian consumers and the foreign buyers of 80 per cent of our forest products in the United States, Japan and China into believing that B.C.'s forests are sustainably managed. CSA forest certification for sustainable forest management is a sham and falsely represents what is happening to provincial forests. Today, July 21st, on behalf of six signatories and supported by Stand.earth and Ancient Forest Alliance, Ecojustice filed a request for an investigation by the federal Competition Bureau into CSA’s false and misleading sustainability allegations. Readers can find below the media release and the text of the complaint. Thanks go to Ecojustice for crafting the complaint: https://ecojustice.ca/case/calling-for-an-investigation-into-sustainable-logging-in-b-c/ Text for the press release may be found in full here: https://ecojustice.ca/pressrelease/sustainable_forestry_claims_false/… Text for the complaint filed with the federal Competition Bureau may be found in full here: https://ecojustice.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/2021-07-21-CSA-CB-Complaint.pdf CSA complaint.Media release.EMBARGO July 21 2021.docx 2021-06-01 CSA CB Complaint.pdf
  2. Am I in Canada? Marauding goons? Shattered glass at night. Indeed, how far is this going to go? The horrific images and the stories being shared with other countries speak to premier Horgan running a failed state. Horgan must end this violence; guarantee the safety of protesters; and, protect the 3% of remaining old-growth forests.
  3. Premier Horgan in four years has established a reputation as a mountebank (reconciliation, site C dam, species-at-risk legislation, forestry legislation reform, log exports, old-growth protection, etc.). Pathetically, like most unsophisticated swindlers, he has grossly underestimated the intelligence of most of those whom he has intended to hood wink. The cat is out of the bag. And British Columbians now know for sure that the real colonialist is John Horgan himself, whose government signed this agreement with a poor and abused First Nation knowing full well that the agreement effectively "continues the exploitation of forests on unceded traditional territory in violation of the rights if indigenous peoples and their unsettled land claim" (YM) both by the government and the forest industry, thereby making a farce of the whole notion of reconciliation. Out of self interest, if not a sense of decency and honour, the BC NDP caucus might do a service to British Columbians if it considered the finding of a new leader keeping in mind that Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation and MLA for OakBay - Gordon Head, signed this colonial agreement. Removal of John Horgan as leader would be a good first step toward the BC NDP making good on its election commitments and promises.
  4. Why isn't the RCMP charging these thugs with mischief and some of them with assault? Where are Western Forest Products, Teal Jones and premier Horgan in denouncing this violence?
  5. John Horgan ran both his election campaigns without any meaningful new policy for forestry. Anything promised has not been delivered. He apparently doesn't know anything about forestry and doesn't listen to anyone who does. His advice, if he seeks it, comes from a cabal of unelected party insiders, the forest industry, and a forests ministry -- the mindustry -- wholly captured by the industry. Horgan after Adrian Dix took the wind out of the sails of a progressive BC NDP just as Glen Clark did after Mike Harcourt. What makes matters worse is that Horgan and his insiders implicitly champion the deregulated forestry policy that they inherited from the BC Liberals. It is heartbreaking to know that we have a premier of the province who appears to be absolutely clueless about the three defining issues of our time -- water, biodiversity loss and climate change -- and about the combined, devastating roles played by the industry and forests ministry in making all three worse. God help us.
  6. Thank you David Broadland for your thorough analysis of Justice Verhoeven's ruling. It appears to me that you have set out solid grounds for an appeal of the judge's decision. Let's hope that a lawyer, who cares about justice as opposed to the legal system, steps forth to represent pro bono the Fairy Creek demonstrators in an appeal. Indeed, as you point out so well, "the irreparable harm" is to the public interest with outrageously bloated subsidies to the forest industry that employs only 1.9% of BC's jobs and generates only 2% of BC's gross domestic product (Source: BC Stats). It is these inordinate government subsidies together with a complete absence of BC NDP forest policy that enable the forest industry's ongoing destruction of communities, watersheds, rivers, drinking water, biodiversity, caribou, salmon, grizzlies, wolves, carbon reserves, high-value old-growth primary forests, forestland, and climate. By continuing to allow the logging of high-value, old-growth, primary forests, is premier John Horgan practising ecocide?
  7. Thank you David Broadland for your thorough analysis of Justice Verhoeven's ruling. It appears to me that you have set out solid grounds for an appeal of the judge's decision. Let's hope that a lawyer, who cares about justice as opposed to the legal system, steps forth to represent pro bono the Fairy Creek demonstrators in an appeal. Indeed, as you point out so well, "the irreparable harm" is to the public interest with outrageously bloated subsidies to the forest industry that employs only 1.9% of BC's jobs and generates only 2% of BC's gross domestic product (Source: BC Stats). It is these inordinate government subsidies together with a complete absence of BC NDP forest policy that enable the forest industry's ongoing destruction of communities, watersheds, rivers, drinking water, biodiversity, caribou, salmon, grizzlies, wolves, carbon reserves, high-value old-growth primary forests, forestland, and climate. By continuing to allow the logging of high-value, old-growth, primary forests, is premier John Horgan practising ecocide?
  8. Thank you, Margaret, for an excellent letter to John Horgan. As a fellow senior, I'd like to add a couple of points: The age group 20 to 39 years is also the group that by necessity is more mobile than other groups. They are on every frontline in health facilities, in retail and grocery stores, in policing and fire brigades and in parenting taking kids to and from school. It is that age group that holds the rest of society together. Horgan's castigation of the young in public has shown all of us that we have a premier without elementary leadership skills. The man is confrontational and divisive, both qualities rendering him unfit for the job he holds.
  9. Posted December 7, 2020 Image: Once vibrant Ocean Falls is now all but abandoned. The hidden agenda of industrial forestry companies in BC is privatization of publicly-owned land. Rural communities dependant on forestry need to resist that and support changes that would increase local, public control of the working forest. Go to story
  10. The hidden agenda of industrial forestry companies in BC is privatization of publicly-owned land. Rural communities dependant on forestry need to resist that and support changes that would increase local, public control of the working forest. THE FOREST SECTOR has deep roots in rural British Columbia with multi-generational families working in the industry either directly in logging or in related businesses like selling logging trucks. Continued forest industry decline threatens a long-established way of life for those relatively few people remaining in the sector. The forest industry’s decline began in 1988. Since then, that decline has been exacerbated by the impacts of the mountain pine beetle epidemic and by a shortage in timber supply owing to unsustainable logging, wildfires and forest health issues related to clearcutting and climate change. Since 1988, the forest industry has contracted radically. The pulp mills that once stood in Prince Rupert, Kitimat, Ocean Falls, Port Alice, Campbell River, Gold River, Tahsis and Woodfibre are long since gone. Since 2000, over 80 sawmills province-wide have been shuttered. Mining, not forest products, is now B.C.’s largest export sector. The Elk Falls pulp, paper and lumber mill at Campbell River on Vancouver Island is one of many major forest product manufacturers around BC that have closed permanently since 2000, cutting forest-related employment in half. Rural British Columbians have dealt with, and adapted to, massive job losses in the forest sector over the last three decades. In 2000, jobs in forestry, logging, support services and wood products manufacturing numbered 101,000. Since then, over 55,000 jobs have been lost. The industry’s once-proud claim that forestry paid for healthcare and education is now illusory. Government revenue reporting shows that forestry does not pay its own bills never mind underpinning social service expenditures. The forest industry now accounts for a mere 2 percent of provincial gross domestic product. The once vibrant Ocean Falls (inset), now all but abandoned. The choice for industry was clear and it decided on its strategy years ago: maximize short-term profit; invest profits in mills overseas as the best of the old-growth forests are logged; shutter mills; and sell associated assets and working forest (tenure). Forest-dependent British Columbians have a choice between two options for their future: to maintain the industrial status quo and suffer further decline, or to collaborate with government in changing how forestry works in B.C. and reap the rewards of forward thinking. Ninety-four percent of B.C. remains public land. By retaining public ownership of the land, British Columbians keep open their options for land use compatible with timber production. This allows for diversified local economies. The forest industry has had a “working forest” since the beginning of the 20th century. It is called the “tenure system.” Unlike the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR), from which land can be removed for other uses, timber volume or land cannot be removed from a forest tenure holder for other uses without compensation. So, with security of timber supply in place, why do some rural British Columbians sign petitions for a “working forest” at the behest of the Council of Forest Industries and the BC Forestry Alliance? They do so not recognizing that the forest industry already has a working forest and blind to the industry’s hidden agenda, which is to privatize forest land. That said, the present working forest or tenure system does badly need revamping to take away control of public forests from an oligopoly of multinational corporations and to place it in the hands of local forest trusts. This would require removing large corporate industry from the woods and having it do what it does best, which is manufacturing, not forestry. Regional log markets would allow mid-sized and small manufacturers to access the available supply of timber. Local residents would find employment both in the woods under the administration of local forest trusts and in private sector manufacturing plants—niche, value-added and primary. A forester general would report to the legislature and have powers to set standards for regional forest practices, to audit the activities of local forest trusts and regional log markets, to oversee regional research, and to provide the legislature with detailed, annual forestry reports. Change in the governance of forests along these suggested lines would preserve a rural way of life now badly threatened by maintaining the industrial status quo. Such change would be focused on local economic and environmental well-being. This vision would be achieved by re-writing forestry laws based on the principles of sustainability and conservation, of local forest administration, of open access to timber, and, last but not least, of reliance upon the will of rural British Columbians to change, survive and succeed. Anthony Britneff worked for the B.C. Forest Service for 40 years holding senior professional positions in inventory, silviculture and forest health.
  11. Indeed, but misinformation and misrepresentation are nevertheless deceptive. The forests inventory is not "crappy" for the purpose of delineating primary forest in the timber harvesting land base. Most technical staff in the forests ministry are competent and during my time with the ministry a screw-up by technical staff of this magnitude would have been inconceivable . . . impossible. And I suspect (and hope) the same is true today. So I doubt that the misleading information came from technical staff but rather from the political-administrative interface in the BC NDP government, meaning the forests ministry executive and staffers in the minister's and premier's offices. The BC NDP politicians continue to perpetrate what is now confirmed to be an outright lie. Witness Premier Horgan's recent mandate letter to new forests minister Katrine Conroy in which Horgan writes, “Implement the recommendations of the Old Growth Strategic Review in collaboration with Indigenous leaders, labour, industry, and environmental groups to protect more old- growth stands – in addition to the 353,000 hectares protected in September 2020.”
  12. We have a fundamental problem in British Columbia, Canada, whereby the province is not living up to its constitutional obligation to look after natural resources in the public interest. The provincial government needs to re-draft legislation for all resources so that the respective statutes are subordinate to over-arching legislation for sustainability and for regional land-use planning. Professional reliance has done a good job of show-casing this fundamental problem of constitutional negligence. Now, our new provincial government must act to redress the problem -- we expect no less.
  13. Update on Martin Watts' lawsuit in the Times Colonist, Tuesday May 16, 2017: http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/op-ed/comment-forester-pays-high-price-for-doing-honest-job-1.19956225 And in Desmog Canada, Friday May 12, 2017: https://www.desmog.ca/2017/05/12/civil-suit-alleges-b-c-blacklisting-forestry-consultant-who-warned-timber-overcutting-faulty-data
×
×
  • Create New...