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Found 7 results

  1. until
    Protecting our Coast: The Shifting Role of BC Lighthouses Opens at the Maritime Museum of BC Lighthouses and their keepers’ original role has been to protect vessels travelling along the coast from crashing into dangerous shoreline. As technology and society continues to change, so too has the role of the lighthouse. Over the years, lighthouses have been put to different roles, depending on the needs of society. In the late 1800’s they served to support colonial development on the coast; in WWII they helped establish a defence system; and now, a new trend has started to rise. As we’ve become increasingly concerned with the state of the natural environment, lighthouses in B.C. are shifting into becoming ecological reserves or are gaining an environmentally-related protected status, with their keepers becoming the guardians of their stations’ landscapes and the surrounding wildlife. This exhibit explores this cultural shift through a timeline approach, questioning what is has meant, and what it now means to protect our coast. “Lighthouses on our coast have such fascinating stories,” said Brittany Vis, Associate Director. “When we started research for this exhibit, it became clear that lighthouses have served additional roles in society than simply as navigational aids. We hope visitors will walk away from this exhibit with a better understanding of the evolving role of lighthouses and how they are being used today.” Exhibit Dates: October 31 – May 14, 2020 634 Humboldt Street, Victoria BC 10am-4pm, Thursday-Friday 10am-5pm, Saturdays
  2. In Nature’s Realm: Early Naturalists Explore Vancouver Island The Victoria Historical Society presents a talk, In Nature’s Realm: Early Naturalists Explore Vancouver Island by Michael Layland, on Thursday, November 28, 2019 at James Bay New Horizons Centre, 234 Menzies Street, Victoria V8V 2G7. Doors open at 7:15 p.m. for refreshments and conversation. A short business meeting beginning at 7:45 will be followed immediately by the speaker. Michael Layland will introduce his third book delving into the progression of European knowledge of Vancouver Island. The book celebrates how the diverse local flora and fauna captured the interest of naturalists among the explorers, settlers, and visitors. A life-long amateur naturalist, Michael has combined this interest with his history of exploration and cartography of our island. Michael, a former president of the society, has presented several talks to the VHS. Copies of his books will be available for sale and signing.
  3. The Victoria Historical Society presents a talk, Don’t Never Tell Nobody Nothin’ Nohow: The Real Story of West Coast Rum Running by Rick James, Thursday, October 24, 2019 at James Bay New Horizons Centre, 234 Menzies Street, Victoria V8V 2G7. Doors open at 7:15 p.m. for refreshments and conversation. A short business meeting beginning at 7:45 will be followed immediately by the speaker. Using extensive research, this presentation will explain that rum running in BC was generally carried out in a relatively civilized manner: but still, the business was associated with the odd shootout, hijacking and even a particularly gruesome murder. Rick James is a maritime historian and author of several books and periodical articles. His latest book on West Coast rum running was recently shortlisted for the annual U.B.C.s Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for an Outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia history.
  4. Tea & Talks: Indigenous Waterways of Haida Gwaii Thursday August 1, 2019; 2:30pm On August 1, join Tiffany Storrey at the Maritime Museum of BC as she explores the Indigenous Waterways of Haida Gwaii: The waters around Haida Gwaii have been used by Haida people since as long as we know. The water and land have become intertwined with our culture and our traditional ways of life. This talk is a short exploration into my own culture and connection with the waters of Haida Gwaii. Come on down to the Maritime Museum every other Thursday for Tea & Talks! Museum volunteers, archival staff, and educators present unique artefacts from our collection, surrounded by discussions of maritime history and other seaworthy topics – all over a cup of tea and refreshments! This program FREE with museum admission or membership! Location: The Maritime Museum of BC 634 Humboldt Street Victoria, BC V8W 1A6 Website
  5. Victoria Event Explores life of Early Bute Inlet Pioneers Victoria’s Bolen Books is pleased to present an event with Judith Williams, who will be giving a talk and slide show based on her new book, Raincoast Chronicles 24: Cougar Companions, Bute Inlet Country and the Legendary Schnarrs ($26.95, Harbour Publishing), which explores the history of Bute Inlet and traces the remarkable story of the Schnarr family. Williams’s presentation, which will be followed by a book signing, takes place on Tuesday, May 28 at 7pm. Raincoast Chronicles 24 is an impeccably researched and richly illustrated history of Bute Inlet’s pioneering residents, including August Schnarr and his family. Schnarr, a trapper and a logger in the region from 1910 until the 1960s, was also an amateur photographer who faithfully took a Kodak camera on his many expeditions and used it to capture experiences on the family homestead. To create this fascinating history of these pivotal pioneers, Williams went on research trips to Bute Inlet and the Homathko Valley, conducted interviews and delved into oral history and old diaries. She also used Schnarr’s impressive collection of photos showing life on the remote BC coast—including those of floathouses, log booms, steam donkeys, residents with giant fish catches, boats and pictures documenting August’s daughters with their pet cougars. Judith Williams is an assistant professor emeritus at the University of British Columbia and is also the author of Clam Gardens (New Star Books, 2006) and Dynamite Stories (New Star Books, 2003). She lives on Cortes Island, BC. Bolen Books is located at Hillside Centre (1644 Hillside Avenue). Admission is free and books will be for sale at the event. For more information, please phone 250-595-4232 or visit www.bolen.bc.ca. www.harbourpublishing.com
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    Pockets in the House of Carr
  7. Leslie Campbell

    Who Wins?

    “Who Wins?: The Battle for California’s Energy Market between Vancouver Island and Puget Sound Coal Mines, 1880 -1914” with Jack Bryden Presented by the Victoria Historical Society Thursday, May 23, 2019 at James Bay New Horizons, 234 Menzies Street, Victoria V8V 2G7. Doors open at 7:15 pm for refreshments and conversation. A short business meeting at 7:45 pm will be followed immediately by the speaker, Jack Bryden. Admission is free for members, $5 for guests. See website www.victoriahistoricalsociety.bc.ca. How did Vancouver Island energize California? Between 1880 and 1914, the rapidly growing state of California relied on imported coal to power everything from locomotives and warships to stoves and heaters in private homes. Yet, despite tariff barriers and competition from Washington State, Vancouver Island coal producers became the major suppliers of coal to the Golden State. Jack Bryden, a former employee of the BC Ministry of Environment, is a past-president of the BC Water and Waste Association and the current President of the Victoria Historical Society. Jack and wife Britta presently divide their time between residences in Victoria and Quebec City where Jack is on the Board of the 195 year old Literary and Historical Society of Quebec.
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